07 September 2016

Let It Grow

So much for the procrastination cure about which I wrote the other day. Let it grow, indeed. I've got to carry on until I get this out of my system. A couple of weeks ago it was Walt Whitman, yesterday it was Chekhov and today it seems to be the Grateful Dead.

In 1995, in the US for the Internet Law Symposium at which I had been invited to speak, I'd hired a car to drive from Seattle to Bellingham to visit friends - and, come to think of it, to run the Mount Erie race, billed as "Skagit County's Oldest and Steepest Road Race", which didn't put me off because it was the only race in the area that weekend. Point-to-point, finishing at the summit, then you had to jog back down again which was even more painful than running up the hill. To make matters worse, it was just a week after my first Marathon.

As the hire car was provided with a cassette player (remember them?), I invested in something to listen to - and, seeking to expand my musical horizons and unaware of who else would be speaking at the Symposium I bought this ...

Of course it didn't come ready-autographed, but I was rather pleased to have it to hand when I met Barlow. (He signed it with his email address, a very modern thing to do in 1995 - I have erased the second part although I imagine he hands it out fairly liberally. In fact it's on his homepage, and so are his phone numbers and real-world addresses.) A couple of years later he kindly gave me permission to reproduce his essay about intellectual property on the Internet, "Selling Wine Without Bottles", in my Sourcebook on Intellectual Property Law. What a nice guy. One of those people I'm pleased to be able to say I've met in my life, like Stephane Grapelli, Ted Heath, Simon Callow, Harold MacMillan, Jackie Stewart, Leonard Bernstein, Michael Tippett, Peggy Ashcroft, Michael Fallon, Dave Pegg, Eugene Ionescu, Joanne Harris, Jeffrey Archer, David Putnam, Michael Portillo and Roger Bannister (a rather random selection: please excuse me if I have omitted you).

And while I am on the subject ... I rather like his Principles of Adult Behaviour, although following principles set down by a member of the Grateful Dead reminds me of Hunter S Thompson offering advice on life. And having sought out that link I am reminded that this is all "Reading Galbraith" and I should occupy my time more profitably.

A great tape, too, which I enjoyed listening to frequently until car tape players disappeared.

Looks like rain

No it doesn't look like rain, for once, but it's a great song which has come to my attention in a very nice way and which cries out to be used here. I won't wait until rain threatens, which probably won't be long anyway. An added bonus is that the lyrics are by John Perry Barlow who, as readers of this blog might remember (because I have been known to mention it before) is the only member of the Grateful Dead with whom I have ever shared a stage - at the Internet Law Symposium, in Seattle, back in the days (1995 - I wonder how I fitted that in with everything else I was doing at the time: perhaps I wasn't teaching the LPC by then) when Internet Law was so new no-one except perhaps Barlow knew anything about it, and we were all making it up as we went along. Well, I certainly was. And at least I can claim to be a lawyer, not a retired cattle rancher and sometime lyricist.

Having spent several weeks hobbling around having (as I told my doctor the other day) bu****ed my plantar fascia - the usual problem, running too far too fast too soon once it felt a bit better - I have hit upon a magic cure, which isn't magic at all but perfectly well-known if you just know where to look on the Web (www.return2fitness.co.uk). And once I'd placed an order for a brace and some clever sticky tape, I used some of Mel's kinesiology tape and fixed the problem even before the delivery arrived.

There's a strip under my foot too, running from the ball of the foot to my old friend Achilles. Return2fitness.com suggested that taping and bracing overnight would show quick results, but I've been amazed at just how quickly it has worked. Had I tried it a few weeks ago I might have saved my entry in the Loch Ness Marathon but even if my plantar fascia will permit me to run there's no way I can get back Marathon-fit in a couple of weeks. Indeed I could have been cross-training, as in my imagination I hear many readers (many? who am I kidding?) telling me, but I really can't get into riding a bike around with no destination in sight, or swimming up and down a pool: I prefer to run pointlessly. How stupid is that? Don't answer that, on a postcard or otherwise: I know very well how stupid it is.

Now that I have reached my seventh decade, which is the way I like to express it because prime numbers are much more fun than ordinary ones, I'm taking on a lot more work. Is it typical of me to do the opposite of what most people do? I will be teaching intellectual property law two days a week, inconveniently at Nottingham Law School but if you ignore the fact that it's 130 miles up the road (and the railways do not offer a viable alternative from Oxfordshire) it's a great institution, and I expect to have fun. And I know quite a nice morning run along the river there.

01 September 2016