28 September 2014

Autumn

I heard this beautiful piece on Radio 3 on Thursday, and although it alludes to a rather different autumn from the one I am having - Chaminade's seems a little melancholy - it is too apposite, and lovely, to be ignored.

Yesterday I ran the Blandford Parkrun for the second time, managing to get to the start in time to join the throng and embed myself a few rows behind the serious speed merchants and small boys at the front before the starter shouted "go!" and I had to turn round and head back the way I had just come. Next time I *will* leave at 8 o'clock to get there on time.
Good form, I think! Photo by marky444
Encouraged by my run last Tuesday with Didcot Runners, and specifically with Jean-Luc with whom I had done so many Amblers club runs in the past, I set myself a fast pace and stuck to it. The knowledge that I had kept going at an average 8:18 pace, but mostly at about 8 minutes/mile (a slow first mile accounted for the average - that was the mile in which I was talking to people: I soon shut up as Jean-Luc's pace took all my breath) encouraged me just to keep huffing and puffing and putting one foot in front of the other. The huffing and puffing was hard work, and noisy, sucking air in for two steps then forcing it out over the next couple of paces, but I knew that if I could do it for 5 miles then 5K was going to be a walk in the park - or at least a tempo run on the trail.

Perhaps the fact that I had not been able to find The Watch helped: there was no indication of how fast I was going to distract me from the job in hand. The course rises from the start - it's a narrow track, asphalt for the most part, and giving the impression that before Beeching it served a different purpose - then soon dives under the main road to Shaftesbury and climbs up the other side. Reaching the top of the descent, I realised that people around me were not going to commit to a crazy rush to the bottom, as I did, so I passed a few there and kept the pace up for the uphill section on the other side.

My race was spent mostly in proximity to two men in black, one with a ponytail and the other with a traithlon club tee-shirt - a potentially dangerous companion, from my experience of triathletes. I got to the turn first of the three, taking it wide to keep my speed up - I think my triathlete friend paused to clean his shades ...
Photo by marky444
Somewhere along the return leg the second man in black (but white socks) left the two of us for dead. I thought I had in turn shaken off the traithlete but about half a mile out he appeared at my shoulder again and it took a big effort to drop him before we reached the finish. With it in sight I tried a final effort to catch the guy in front - Mr Ponytail was way off in the distance by now - but try as I might it wasn't happening. I needed to have done it a hundred yards or so earlier, but at that moment I was taking a short breather after attacking the climb from the tunnel under the road.

I thanked my two running-mates for their company, chatted a while with one of them and another runner who remarked on my footwear (ha! that's exactly what you're supposed to do!) and headed off, thanking the marshalls as I went. Running without The Watch meant a sense of anticipation that is completely lacking if I already know my time - although so often I forget to stop it, I don't really know what the time was anyway. So when it came through at 23:11, average pace 7:27, age-graded score 68 per cent, a season's best and only 49 seconds off my best ever Parkrun (from last October), I was delighted - and especially pleased that I made the decision a few weeks ago to focus on season's bests rather than all-time PBs. A much more realistic thing to aim at: although I ought to be able to find that 49 seconds somewhere, and then the elusive sub-20 will be in sight (well, if you have exceptionally good distance vision).

On the way, I will break the 70 per cent age-grading barrier, which I don't think I have ever managed before. It will help if I can shed a few pounds - just as well that the Dorset beer festival was after the Parkrun ...


1 comment:

Anna said...

Great job, congratulations! I also prefer to run without The Watch!:)